Friday, March 04, 2011

100 Reasons to Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading Room

“The Alzheimer’s Reading Room is clearly one of the most informative and unbiased Alzheimer’s blogs. Bob DeMarco provides information on all things Alzheimer’s. His blog covers the spectrum on Alzheimer’s issues, featuring everything from critical advice from someone who is on the front line caring for a loved one with the disease, to translating and reporting on the science and research that is leading the way to a cure. All of us in the Alzheimer’s community are fortunate that Bob has taken on this important work. At Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, we encourage people to follow the blog and rely on it ourselves to stay up to date and in touch.”
-- Tim Armour, President of Cure Alzheimer’s Fund

Read more at the Alzheimer's Reading Room

Sunday, February 07, 2010

Flavanol Rich Cocoa Consumption Improves Blood Flow to the Brain

Cocoa flavanols, the unique compounds found naturally in cocoa, may increase blood flow to the brain, according to research published in the Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment journal.
By Bob DeMarco


The researchers suggest that long-term improvements in brain blood flow could impact cognitive behavior, offering future potential for debilitating brain conditions including dementia and stroke.

In a scientific study of healthy, older adults ages 59 to 83, Harvard medical scientists found that study participants who regularly drank a cocoa flavanol-rich beverage, had an eight percent increase in brain blood flow after one week, and 10 percent increase after two weeks.
This information should be of interest to Alzheimer's caregivers, and is certainly worth considering.


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Cocoa flavanols, the unique compounds found naturally in cocoa, may increase blood flow to the brain, according to new research published in the Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment journal. The researchers suggest that long-term improvements in brain blood flow could impact cognitive behavior, offering future potential for debilitating brain conditions including dementia and stroke.